Sunset In Sedona Two Needle Socks

 
Sunset In Sedona Two Needle Socks
 
Finished sizes about: 6 ½- 7 (7 ½, 8, 9, 9 ½)” foot circumference.

Yarn used: 1 skein of Aslan Trends Natural Luxury Yarns Santa Fe 1334 yarn from their Kettle Hand Dyed Collection. 50g / 1.75 oz. 85% Merino Wool / 15% Polyamide. Approx: 180 yards / 165 meters

Needles size: One pair of straight needles size US 0-3 (2-3.25 mm) or whatever size is needed to obtain the gauge of 7 stitches per inch in St st. (Personally, I used US size 5 needles to obtain gauge, but I‘m just weird that way).

Other supplies: Some stitch holders or scrap threads to hold stitches on. You may find a row counter to be helpful in keeping track of rows while knitting the heel flap.

Special skills you need to make this sock: Flat seam (aka- Bickford seam)

Leg Portion
 
 Cast on 44 (52, 56, 64, 68) sts. Work a 2 x 2 rib stitch for one inch or until you‘re tired of knitting it.

Now, working in St st, continue to knit until the sock measures 4 inches from the top. (And yes, I know what you are thinking, “It’s just a freaking square. I wanted a sock, not a wonky dishcloth. WTF!” Just hang in there with me, its about to get interesting.)

Dividing Section
 
 First row: Knit the first 11 (13,14,16,17) stitches. Place these stitches on a stitch holder. Now continue knitting to the end of the row.

Next row: Knit 11 (13, 14, 16, 17) stitches. Place these stitches on a stitch holder.

At this point you should have 22 (26, 28, 32, 34) stitches left on the needle. These stitches will become your instep or top half of your foot. *(Please note- it is from this dividing point that you will measure for your foot length.)

With 22 (26, 28, 32, 34) stitches now on your needle, continue in St st until the piece measures 1 ½ to 2 inches less then your desired total foot length. (You are going to start the next row with the right side facing you. You have been warned!)

Touch Your Toes
 
 Row 1: (RS) k1, ssk, knit to the last 3 stitches, k2tog, k1.

Row 2: Purl

Repeat these two rows until there are 11 (13, 14, 16, 17) stitches remain. Ending again with right side facing you.

Row 3: (RS) k1, ssk, knit to last 3 stitches, k2tog, k1

Row 4: P1, p2tog, purl to last 3 stitches, p2tog tbl, p1.

Continue these two rows until 6 ( 7, 7, 8, 8 ) stitches remain.

Place these stitches on a stitch holder. Cut yarn leaving a nice tail for weaving.

(See, that was painless. Now for the fun part!)

Take the stitches that have been hanging out on the other two stitch holders, and with both right side facing you, place these stitches onto your needle.

Knit one row. Then purl the next row. (I know, amazing instructions there, right?)

Heel Flap Time
 
 Row 1: (RS) *Sl 1 pwise with yarn in back (wyb), k1; rep from*

Row 2: Sl 1 pwise, with yarn in front (WYF), purl to the end.

Repeat these two rows until a total of 22 (26, 28, 32, 34) rows have been made. (And yes, the number of stitches you have on the needle right now is the same as the number of rows you knit for the heel flap. It was a total freaking mind-blowing epiphany when I realized that!)

Let’s Take This Heel For A Turn
 
 Row 1: (RS) K13 (15, 16, 18, 19) stitches, ssk, k1, turn your work.

Row 2: (WS) Sl 1 pwise, p5, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 3: Sl 1 pwise, knit to the 1st stitch before the gap made from the pervious row, ssk using the 1st stitch before the gap and the 1st stitch right after the gap, K1, turn.

Row 4: Sl 1 pwise, purl to the 1st stitch before the gap, p2tog using the 1st stitch both before and after the gap, p1, turn.

Now repeat rows 3 and 4 until all the stitches have been worked. Do NOT freak out if you find that you can not end with a k1 or p1 in your repeats. Depending on your initial cast on number, you may end that last repeat with a ssk or a p2tog. Make sure to end with the right side facing you.

Guess What? It’s Gusset Time!
 
 For this gusset, you will be picking up one extra stitch at the selvage edge corner. This will help eliminate that nasty hole at the base of the gusset. Don’t you worry, you will make these extra two stitches disappear shortly after both sides of the gusset in done.
 
(Of course you can knit this section without the two extra stitches and it will still turn out just fine. I just have a bit of a pointy ankle bone, so those two extra stitches keep my ankle from looking like its trying to escape.)

Now, using the needle that your stitches are already on, pick up 12 (14, 15, 17, 18 ) stitches along the salvage edge. Now knit across these stitches and the stitches that were already on your needle.

Once you reach the end of the row, with the same needle, pick up 12 (14, 15, 17, 18 ) stitches on the other side of the salvaged edge. Now, purl across all stitches. (Your stitches will feel and look a bit bunched up on your needles, but don’t fret. Things will start to loosen up in a bit here.)

Knit 11 (13, 14, 16, 17 ) stitches, ssk, knit across heel turn stitches, k2tog, then knit the remaining 11 (13, 14, 16, 17 ) stitches.

Next row: Purl

(See, I told you that you would send those two extra stitches away!)

Row 1: (RS) k1, ssk, knit to last 3, k2tog, k1.

Row 2: Purl

Repeat these two rows until 22 (26, 28, 32, 34 ) stitches remain.

Now continue in straight St st until piece measures 1 ½ to 2 inches less then your desired foot length.

Toe Time!
 
 Row 1: (RS) k1, ssk, knit to the last 3 stitches, k2tog, k1.

Row 2: Purl

Repeat these two rows until there are 11 (13, 14, 16, 17 ) stitches remain. Ending again with right side facing you.

Row 3: (RS) k1, ssk, knit to last 3 stitches, k2tog, k1

Row 4: P1, p2tog, purl to last 3 stitches, p2tog tbl, p1.

Continue these two rows until 6 ( 7, 7, 8, 8 ) stitches remain.

Gaft these stitches with the others you have sitting on the stitch holder.

Now you have some hand sewing to do. No moaning allowed. It’s not as hard as you think.

To seam the sock we will NOT be using the mattress stitch and I will tell you why. *Stepping up on top of soapbox* The mattress stitch subtracts rows from the sides of the foot and the back of the leg. Also, it leaves a bulky seam that, even after you steam it down, can still be felt.

Instead, we will close the seams by using the Flat Seam, also sometimes called the Bickford Seam. It makes a flat, clean seam that is almost invisible when done correctly.

The Bickford seam is one of those things that you have to see to understand, so please stop right now, go check out an online video on how to do it, then return to your sock and seam it up. (I’ll still be here waiting when you get back. I promise.)

Once you seamed up your sock, maybe you should seriously consider knitting the other one. Socks are usually better in pairs. (If you just want to relish in your one sock glory, I’m cool with that too.)

So, you’ve got both socks knitted and seamed. Guess what? You’re done. Yup, that’s it. You’re finished. Now make like a hockey stick and get the puck out of here!

Advertisements

29 thoughts on “Sunset In Sedona Two Needle Socks

  1. Why do so many patterns leave out the 60 stitch version? (My size!) There must be a reason but all the other sizes go up in multiples of four so why 56 (too small) or 64 much too big missing out the 60. I really want to make these too.

    • Hi Sara,

      Don’t go thinking that there is some evil sock conspiracy forming against you. I have trouble finding good patterns for my size too. Most knitters just learn to adapt a pattern to fit their needs. I only knit socks on two straight needles, so I have to change any pattern that I select in order to knit it the way that works for me. But if you want, I’d be more then willing to do the math and give you the numbers for a 60 stitch:

      Cast on 60. Do leg as written, when its time to divide, knit 15, place on stitch holder. Knit all the way across. Purl 15, place these stitches on a holder. Work with the 30 stitches remaining on your needles until foot measures two inches less then desired length. Following the foot decrease in pattern, decrease until there are 16 stitches left on the needle. Then do the second decrease until there are 4 stitches left. Place stitches on holder.

      Go back and place the other stitches that were on holders back on your needles, (30 stitches). Do the heel flap until 30 rows have been made. For heel turn, knit 17 and then continue as written. Pick up 15 stitches on each side of heel flap for the gusset. Now decrease as directed until you have 30 stitches again and continue in the same manner as the top of the foot. Close the toe, stitch up the sides and you my dear have socks fit just for you.

      • There seem to be some mistakes in this pattern. If you start with an even number of stitches, and decrease at both ends of rows, there is no way you are going to end up with an odd number (for example, I have 26 ss, so it’s not possible to decrease ‘until 13 ss remain’ as instructed).

      • Hi Clare, 26 divided by 2 equals 13. That is how I got the number 13. So, yes, sometimes when you start with an even number you can end with an odd number. Its some sort of crazy math thing which I’m sure those math geeks out there have a name for. I’ve learned to never question math- just let it do its magic. So trust me, if you keep decreasing, you will go from 26 to 13.

    • I’m glad you liked the pattern. It’s hard for me to take myself to seriously. The humor that I put in my patterns usually show off the real me but unfortunately are a tech editor’s nightmare. 😉

  2. About the reduction – starting with 34 you cannot get to 17 by reducing 2 each time. I am currently on 18 stitches and if i do another row I will be on 16 – how are you getting 17???!!!

    • Hello Louise,

      I do hope you were able to figure out the pattern. Sorry I didn’t give you the proper response that your comment needed two months ago. If you still have questions about the pattern, please let me know. FYI- 34 divided by 2 equals 17. That was how I got the number.

      • No problem, I just went to 18, it was absolutely fine and the socks are great. And, yes, 34 divided by 2 does equal 17, but that’s not what you’re doing. You’re simply taking 2 off each time. Therefore it goes: 34, 32, 30, 28, 26, 24, 22, 20, *18*, 16…..

  3. What a great pattern. So glad I found you on Ravelry. Very easy to knit and I enjoy your ‘method of instruction’. I have knitted one sock and have watched a Bickford tutorial as instructed… but I have managed to knit the bottom of my sock longer than the top by about 2 cm. So I’d better make like a bird and get the flock out of here and fix it!
    Warm wishes, Leah

  4. Thanks a lot, for this pattern, I never knitted socks before and this was the only explanation I could understand (I’m not English mother tongue).
    The only part I really don’t understand is
    Heel Flap Time

    Row 1: (RS) *Sl 1 pwise with yarn in back (wyb), k1; rep from*
    Row 2: Sl 1 pwise, with yarn in front (WYF), purl to the end.

    Does it mean that I do a sort of 1/1 rib with the purled stitch passed and not worked?
    Thank you

  5. Hi, first of all THANK YOU for the pattern!! I am trying to knit my first sock and my brain… you know…! so i have one question for you: you are writting

    ” Dividing Section First row: Knit the first 11 (13,14,16,17) stitches.
    Place these stitches on a stitch holder.
    Now continue knitting to the end of the row.Next row:
    Knit 11 (13, 14, 16, 17) stitches. Place these stitches on a stitch holder.”

    ok knit 11, place on holder, continiue to the END of the row.
    turn and now you are at the wrong side so how can you KNIT 11?
    Do you knit or purl the 11 stitches for the second stitch holder?
    or do you mean knit 11, place on holder knit 22, knit the remaining 11 and place them on holder?

    Thanks in advance!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • You will purl on the wrong side. Sorry, I don’t turn my work when I knit so rarely do I ever purl. I sometimes forget that most knitters don’t knit the way I do. Does make it sort of a challenge for me when writing patterns. Hope this info helps. good luck on your socks.

  6. Thank you so much for your reply!!!!!! Now I’ve got it And thanks again for your written instructions, you have no idea how I love my two straight needles…! I wiss you well!!

  7. Hi there, great pattern. Just a question about the pattern that i could not understand. You say – “For this gusset, you will be picking up one extra stitch at the selvage edge corner. This will help eliminate that nasty hole at the base of the gusset. Don’t you worry, you will make these extra two stitches disappear shortly after both sides of the gusset in done.”
    But if we pick up one extra stitch how come there will be two extra? I know it is stupid but i am an absolute beginner and i want to make this sock . I hope you or some one else will help me.
    Thanx in advance.

    • One more question – “Dividing Section

      First row: Knit the first 11 (13,14,16,17) stitches. Place these stitches on a stitch holder. Now continue knitting to the end of the row.
      Next row: Knit 11 (13, 14, 16, 17) stitches. Place these stitches on a stitch holder.

      At this point you should have 22 (26, 28, 32, 34) stitches left on the needle. These stitches will become your instep or top half of your foot. *(Please note- it is from this dividing point that you will measure for your foot length.)

      With 22 (26, 28, 32, 34) stitches now on your needle, continue in St st until the piece measures 1 ½ to 2 inches less then your desired total foot length. ”
      In this the foot length is to measured from the heel to the toes or from the ankle to the toes? Again I know it is stupid but still plz reply if you can.
      Thank you.

    • Hi Avni,

      Sorry for the very late response. I really don’t use this blog much anymore. I’m sure you already figured it out, but just in case- You will pick up one extra stitch on each side. When you do a gusset, whatever you do on one side you have to do on the other side.

      • thank you very much for the reply. I was able to figure out the pattern myself only with a bit of help from the internet. The sock turned out great (even if I had to rip it ,it was worth the effort).Now i am on the way making the other sock. i really enjoyed the humour in the pattern. 😉

  8. Thank you so much for your sock pattern for beginners. It was wonderful. I like the way you took us step by step and didn’t assume we should know this or that.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s